This project, part of the STIC AmSud international cooperation program, brought together more than 40 researchers and students from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, France, Paraguay and Peru.

From October 5 to 7, the Mosticaw project, led by Pierre-Alexandre Bliman, a professor at FGV’s School of Applied Mathematics (EMAp), held an event entitled “Mosticaw Workshop: Modeling the Dissemination and Control of Arboviruses” in Paraguay, regarding modeling work on the spread and control of arboviruses such as dengue, Zika, chikungunya and yellow fever. This project, part of the STIC AmSud international cooperation program, brought together more than 40 researchers and students from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, France, Paraguay and Peru.

The aim of the workshop was to begin and expand cooperation between the different groups present, in a field where applied mathematics may help biologists, doctors, entomologists and public health professionals to understand the preconditions for the outbreak of epidemics and their behavior over time, and to plan control campaigns for them.

As noted on the table of honor by Professor Bliman, Mosticaw’s international coordinator, the project will further advance regional cooperation in the area of applied mathematics. At a time when FGV is working to open a mathematical epidemiology research center, the value of such partnerships is particularly high. Another EMAp professor, Flávio Codeço Coelho, gave an in-depth talk on the challenges of anti-vector control in the fight against arboviruses, which will be one of the main areas researched by FGV’s mathematical epidemiology center.

EMAp professors Maria Soledad Aronna and Sabrina Camargo, as well as EMAp post-PhD candidate Márcio Watanabe, also took part in the event and presented their work. This included one of the school’s projects, regarding “Control of dengue by introducing Wolbachia bacteria and using insecticides.”

Three French research institutes are involved in this research: Inria is researching information technology and applied mathematics, INRA is doing agricultural research, and CIRAD is doing development-related research. Several Latin American universities are also carrying out research in the area, including Paraguay’s UNA, which organized the workshop, Argentina’s UBA, the University of Chile, and Federico Santa Maria Technical University in Chile.

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